As Within So Without, As Above So Below

I recently wrote about the changes that are happening all around us and the internal unsettledness that change can create. The implication is that external circumstances have a big affect on how we feel. And it’s no wonder. Distressing events in the news trigger our sense of empathy and challenge our very basic human need for survival.

But what if we were to consider the notion that the events in our world are actually a reflection of our inner state?

There is a saying: “As within so without, as above so below.” The origin of this saying goes back to ancient times. My interpretation of it is that our inner thoughts and feelings actually create what we see and experience. What is above, in our mind, will be reflected in the circumstances of our life.

Admittedly, this is tricky territory.

If we are creating our experiences, does it mean that we are to blame for other people’s unkind behavior? What about war? Violence? Natural disasters? Does it mean that we are to blame when physical, emotional, or mental illness appears? There is a degree of responsibility that we can take, but blame misses the point.

On the other hand, if we believe that external circumstances determine how we feel, we can run the risk of thinking and acting as if we are a victim of these circumstances. It’s understandable when this happens. The trouble is, it’s a disempowering cycle.

Here are two ways we can powerfully and creatively use our consciousness to address this dilemma:

  1. Consider life from an energetic perspective.

Certain feelings, such as depression, illness, or apathy, resonate at a low frequency; others, such as love, joy, balance, and harmony, resonate at a high frequency. The more conscious we are about our thoughts and lifestyle decisions, the more we are able to keep our frequency high. This high frequency sends ripples of energy out, like ripples in a pond, having a positive effect both internally and externally. Like a tuning fork that vibrates at a high frequency and raises the frequency of another tuning fork, when you vibrate at a high frequency you will lift others up.

For several years, Lynne McTaggart has conducted a series of scientific studies which provide evidence that thought and intention can change your life and the world. Another study has shown that a group of people practicing transcendental meditation in Washington, D.C. over a two-month period created a “coherence” that reduced crime by 23.3%.

  1. Consider life from a spiritual perspective.

Challenging events in our life can be seen as opportunities to reflect on some of the big questions. What aspect of me is out of balance and being reflected in these distressing events? What personal life experiences or traumas am I holding onto that are creating unhealthy reactivity within myself and in my relationships? What old programming or beliefs are literally eating away at me, possibly contributing to disease?

Mahatma Ghandi said,

“Be the change you wish to see in the world.”

I believe that, when we examine our own consciousness and take responsibility for our own energetic vibration, we have the power to change ourselves and the world. Energy healing, holistic counseling, and spiritual practices are all wonderful ways to support us as we alter our inner states and create the life we desire.